1 weird food that KILLS blood pressure

Subject:   1 weird food that KILLS blood pressure (more for this subject)
From:   Blood Pressure Solution <BloodPressureSolution@ggegcochal.us> (more from this sender)
Date:   Nov 19, 2013 04:09

1 food that kills high blood pressure
 
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want a requirement that industry scrub any  
data of personal information before giving it to the government -- a  
stipulation that Rogers and business groups say would be too onerous and  
deter industry participation.Rogers, who co-sponsored the bill with Rep.  
Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md., the panel's top Democrat, said they altered  
the bill to address other concerns by privacy groups raised last year.  
But a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union, Michelle Richardson,  
said the bill is still objectionable because it could allow the military  
to review data on private commercial networks."A couple of cosmetic changes  
is not enough to address the concerns of members" in the Senate,  
Richardson said.Rogers says the political calculus has changed and that  
China's hacking campaign was too brazen for the White House to justify  
the status quo."There's a line around the Capitol building of companies  
willing to come in and tell us in a classified setting (that)  
`my whole intellectual property portfolio is gone,"' Rogers said. "I've  
never seen anything like this, where we aren't jazzed and our blood  
pressure isn't up."In February, Obama signed an executive order that would  
help develop voluntary industry standards for protecting networks. But the  
White House and Congress agreed that legislation was still needed to address  
the legal liability companies face if they share threat information. Senate  
Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., promised at the
ommitted to dealing with  
the gang problem that is tormenting honest people in his hometown as  
he is to blaming law-abiding gun owners for the acts of psychopathic  
murderers."House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, repeated his view that the  
Senate should act, saying, "It's one thing for two members to come  
to some agreement. It doesn't substitute the will for the other 98  
members."In a written statement, Obama said he'd prefer stronger language  
than the compromise, but he said it represented progress."It recognizes  
that there are good people on both sides of this issue, and  
we don't have to agree on everything to know that we've got  
to do something to stem the tide of gun violence," he said.Other  
highlights of Obama's gun agenda -- including bans on assault weapons and  
high-capacity ammunition magazines -- seem to have little chance of winning  
approval in the Senate, let alone the House.Polls show more than 8  
in 10 people back expanded background checks. Even so, the fight will  
be difficult in both chambers, especially the House, where increasing numbers  
of district lines are drawn to protect incumbents, said James Pasco, executive  
director of the Fraternal Order of Police."They're not going to have a  
constituency in every instance that is champing for that bill," said Pasco,  
whose group has backed the drive for expanded background checks.The director  
of Mayors Against Illegal Guns, one of whose leaders is New York  
City Mayor Michael Bloo
 
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